LA Tenants Union

Who We Are

The LA Tenants Union is a diverse, tenant-led movement fighting for the human right to housing for all. We demand safe, affordable housing and universal rent control. We organize against landlord harassment, mass evictions, and displacement. We mobilize for the repeal of the Ellis Act and Costa-Hawkins Act. Our mission is to strengthen tenants’ political power through education, advocacy, and direct action.

The LA Tenants Union is an autonomous housing movement funded completely by its members. For unemployed members, that amount is just $1 per month ($12 per year). Employed members pay monthly dues of $5 per month ($60 per year).

LA Tenants Union Locals

To mobilize tenants in a city as diverse and expansive as Los Angeles, the LA Tenants Union is establishing local chapters. Locals organize around neighborhood issues and help link neighborhood struggles to the larger movement for housing justice.

We are growing rapidly and have local chapters covering neighborhoods across every corner of Los Angeles to the San Fernando Valley!

Citywide General Assemblies

Monday general membership meetings are great place to start getting involved in the tenants union. Monday night meetings feature education on tenant rights, lively debates about policy, action planning, solidarity and fellowship.

General meetings are every 1st Monday of the Month at the United Teachers of Los Angeles, 7-9PM.

Solidarity Support Network

The LA Tenants Union is building a base of empowered tenants who can educate and support each other in times of need.

Are you being harassed by your landlord? Offered a cash-for-keys agreement? Victim of an Ellis Act eviction? Unfair rent increase? Do you want to start a tenant association in your building? We want to support you!

Language Justice

The LA Tenants Union believes in language justice, which includes the right that everyone has to communicate, to understand, and be understood in the language(s) they feel most comfortable using. We strive to make our communication, as well as meetings and actions, fully bilingual in Spanish and English, and in the future hope to incorporate other languages to create a multilingual housing justice movement. Language justice is a collective responsibility to create inclusive spaces where folks of different backgrounds can listen to each other and participate fully to build power toward a movement that truly represents our city.

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